The Core Semester During MIT’s MBA Program

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

 

With over three decades of experience in the finance sector, during which time he established himself as a hedge fund icon, Arthur “Art” Samberg now leads Hawkes Financial LLC, his family office. An educated individual, Art J. Samberg studied for his MBA at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Current MBA students at MIT study at MIT Sloan, which focuses on creating a collaborative environment.

During their first, or Core, semester at MIT Sloan, new MBA students are divided into six groups. These cohort groups typically contain approximately 70 people of varying cultural backgrounds, with each individual offering diverse experience and interests to the group. Each cohort works together for the duration of the Core semester.

Within each cohort, students split further into teams of six or seven, with each team working together on assignments and projects, in addition to studying for exams. The overall aim of the Core semester and the cohort idea is to demonstrate the diversity that students will encounter once they enter the workplace and prepare them for it.

The College Summit Solution

College Summit Solution pic
College Summit Solution
Image: collegesummit.org

Arthur “Art” J Samberg is an entrepreneur and executive with over three decades of experience on Wall Street and in the financial industry. Currently, Art Samberg is the owner of Hawkes Financial LLC, his family office, which he founded following over a decade of experience as the founder of Pequot Capital Management, Inc. An engaged philanthropist, Mr. Samberg was recently honored as a Lifetime Peer Leader along with former first lady Michelle Obama at the 2016 Peer Forward Gala by College Summit.

College Summit is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and GuideStar Gold Star Charity that works for provide positive peer influence to high school students across the United States. The organization has been recognized by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the World Economic Forum for its work, which is conducted primarily through its PeerForward program.

The PeerForward initiative involves the training and coaching of high school students to serve as positive peers for their friends and classmates. The process begins with the development of partnerships between high schools and College Summit, which then recruits four 11th graders and four 12th graders who are influential amongst their peers. Peer leaders are then trained by College Summit via summer workshops to lead school-wide campaigns and make an impact at their schools, with the ultimate goal of boosting college enrollment and preparedness.